Carote Jahme

“interesting, insightful and very funny”
The Guardian

About Carole Jahme


Carole Jahme is a journalist, author, broadcaster, performer and film and programme maker who manages to synthesise Darwinian theory in almost all of her creative ventures.

Whether she is presenting a television documentary, making you laugh with a live show, or soothing your furrowed brow with her Agony Aunt Column, the rub is that humans have evolved and thus we share innumerable traits with other apes.

Carole started her professional life as a model, dancer and actress, she worked with Gerry Cottles Circus performing on the trapeze, tight rope, clowning, acrobatics and acted in movies, TV, radio and theatre, with the likes of Morgan Freeman and Robert Downey Jr, but the call of the wild, particularly the call of wild primates, proved too seductive to resist…

Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts

Awards
2004 Won Wellcome Trust Award for communication of science to the public
2010 Won European Commission Award for comedy theatre-science production
2012 Won Science & Technology Facilities Council Award for public engagement with science

Carole Jahme's Book Interview - Beauty & The Beasts



Praise For Carole Jahme


'That rare thing, in which journalism and scholarship unite in a riveting insight into a new branch of knowledge … a really good read' -- BEATRIX CAMPBELL, SCOTLAND ON SUNDAY

Jahme is to be commended' -- TIMES HIGHER EDUCATION SUPPLEMENT

"Written with a gracefulness that belies thoroughness." --KIRKUS REVIEWS

"Always entertaining and thought provoking." OBSERVER

"Interesting and insightful." GUARDIAN

The comedy show, “Carole Jahme is Sexually Selected!” is great fun with lots of silly jokes and games, I recommend it ***** EDINBURGH FESTIVAL 2004

Edinburgh show review

Carole Jahme is Biodiverse is a thought-provoking comedy seminar on the importance of conservation, delivered by a woman in a cocktail dress and set of monkey ears. How's that for a hook?

A little way into the show, the most astonishing thing happens: we're joined by two guests from another time, the product of man-as-God and his tinkering with DNA, a pair of proto-humans their costume and mannerisms are very effective. They also offer an opportunity for things to get silly, and an audience which is up for it will have a great time imitating chimpanzee mating calls and dancing along to Dr Doolittle's signature tune.

As well as the laughs, there is a serious message about biodiversity and the loss of species. Jahme shows us several primate species which are on the verge of extinction, but also cheers us with a success story which shows that we can make a difference. I'm pleased that Carole Jahme is Biodiverse brings this discussion to the 2010 Edinburgh Fringe in such an informative and entertaining way.

FringeGuru. Reviewed by Craig Thomson